The Agnus Dei

We had the Agnus Dei sent from Chicago to Scottsdale.  Its a gorgeous sculpture given to my parents from the artist Jean Tock years ago. I’ve always loved it; a modern piece of a boy holding a lamb.  I’ve wanted it for years, and after my brother decided against having the piece, my parents gave it to me.  They are finding new homes to the art I grew up with.  Sad in itself, but its nice to see that other people will get a chance to view what I was blessed with growing up.

In my dad’s office building, there is an art dealer, one of many, who provided the service of shipping the piece to my house.  He’s an older gentleman starting to show the signs of Parkinson’s disease.  He comes across with a warm personality and a love of art.  Though he didn’t seem to impressed with the Agnus Dai, I could understood that as everything else there was of American romantic style.  The dealer came across as an Ernst Hemingway, though one could see he was quite fond of my father.

The dealer would bark orders at the receptionist.  He was kind to me, my dad, and the other few men there looking at the art available.  But he obviously didn’t believe the receptionist’s efficiency was appropriate.  A pretty woman who may have been in her late 30’s or early 40’s… pleasantly gracing the start of middle age. She sat in her chair taking orders, typing on the computer.  Her hands jumped slightly when his voice was directed towards her.  There was no mistaking the slight feeling of fear in her actions.

For the most part, she wouldn’t look at me in the eyes.  I’d write down the address to send the piece, and describe the artist who made it.  All the while her eyes were downturn or on the computer.  When it was time to leave, I said good-bye to her, but with no response… just to the side of her face as she looked into the computer.  When she realized I was still there, she looked at me and we smiled.  It seemed slightly with embarrassment after the realization that someone was actually paying attention to her there, and maybe slightly with fear that it was wasted time she’d be chastised for. But I wanted to at least connect with her in some way that it seems few people who shopped there did.  Friendly.

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